32 States

In the past 5 years, together Jack and I have hit 32 of the United States!

Found these magnets today at Monarch Pass, no 🙄 I don’t know why we have never bought them before!

Any who, I am missing Utah!!! Eyes peeled! Need to find that one and we still have more states to visit!

Kat xo

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Onto Montrose

We left Pueblo this morning and hit the road again to Montrose.

As we climb into Cañon City we were kicking ourselves for not bringing our rafting shoes. Having already bought new runners in OK the old ones have been ditched already, again kicking ourselves for not thinking of it earlier and could have worn them.

Maybe we will try one of the zip line’s this time in Royal Gorge!

The Fourteeners (Colorado series of mountains above 14,000ft) are displaying small dustings of snow still and everything is green and gorgeous this time of year.

It never gets old driving through here!

Through the gorges at around 6,000ft (elev.) we pass rafters, rock climbers and beautiful scenery as we head into Salida.

Another quaint little downtown historic district where white tail deer roam the streets….

…..and old buildings wear gorgeous ghost murals old and new! There are more brew houses than coffee shops and it’s the wrong time of the day for beer tasting.

The temperature is perfect and the weather today is just stunning.

Monarch Pass at a summit of 11,312ft, temperature has dropped to 51F, I seem to recall last time we stopped here it wasn’t as clear and a little cooler than today!

We cross the Continental Divide and make our way down the other side of the pass with coffee and views of pines, snow, sunshine, a chipmunk!! and freakin’ roads with little or no barriers!

From Gunnison we keep on to Cimarron and finally into Montrose.

Side matches start tomorrow!

Kat xo

Other Bits

In between the larger works these were a few of the others.

An Australian inspired shirt for Bat Masterson. The yoke representing the flag and then the Union Jack on the right hand cuff and southern cross on the left cuff.

An all red corset was the request from Sally Skull. So this is a light weight all red with an inside cheeky skull print.

Finally another skirt and a corset for Conplicated Lady. Some gorgeous red boot fabric that Omaha John had, teemed with black fabric and some brown fringe completed this cute little ensemble.

Next!!

Kat xo

Bronc Rider

Western Scarves – a $12 whim at the Pony Express Museum and actual Home Station No.1 in Marysville, Kansas. (Wow! Talk about bring back memories when Jack and I discussed the last Pony Express places we had visited last year!)

 

Funnily enough we were just watching the 1953 film version of Pony Express whilst having this discussion.

The book became the inspiration for the B-Western ensemble for Comin' In Hot and Alamo Andy.

I spent many hours sorting designs, incorporating cactus, boots, horseshoes, rope and stars. The main feature would be the bucking bronc rider.

 

Back to the Western Scarves book. Cowboy's admittedly wore scarves in the practical sense. Keeping out cold, dust and other weather elements whilst riding the open range but it was later into the 1940's and 50's where gorgeous silk scarves were manufactured for rodeo and other events. Silk being the chosen fabric of the time as there was much produced for parachutes during the War.

They soon became a fun genre of rope twirling, bucking bronc cowboys with as many other western elements that could be crammed onto one 18″-36″ square piece of fabric!

Of course the rodeo and souvenir versions became bright and colourful, very different to the muted or 'turkey red' of range days.

In my wild imagination I could see brown, turquoise and red with all other colours made up in other elements. In reality, I found that to my organised eye some things just weren't to gel on this occasion and it became a slightly frustrating journey to the final product.

I found another interesting 1940's feature and injected that into the base of the skirt, with a vivid red detail trimmed in the same peacock piping as the rest of the garment. This would serve as a different trim than the usual fringe finish.

 

Finally the bronc, stars, rope and horseshoes all seemed to fit and with tiny 2mm (remind me when I say I am never buying that size again!!) Aqua and Amber coloured bling it is finished to a subtle vintage look.

 

I hope they like this matching ensemble, they did turn out nice and I hope Comin' In Hot has boots with similar colours to mine in the picture because they certainly picked up the rope detail in it and would be a great option to pair with it.

Kat xo

 

Buffalo Gal Re-Visit

After the external embroiderer work on the large central back buffalo was done, it was time to set to adding bling and bring this beauty into sparkly existence.

 

Don't mind 'Manni', she is not exactly well endowed and doesn't often show gowns off at their best.

 

Suffice to say you can see now the gorgeous sparkle by added rhinestones that have completed this B-Western dress.

Kat xo

 

The Yellow Rose of Texas

Texas – red white and blue strong, patriotic to the core and proud.

The Yellow Rose of Texas – well I'd heard the song before, basically know the tune and had more than likely heard Pa's warbly whistling renditions of it as well.

Do you know the history of it though?

Where is all this leading to you might ask and indeed I though this would be a more straightforward reference to the spectacular B-Western outfit completed for Complicated Lady.

So I will give a quick insight into her outfit and then digress to the history lesson as such.

This one was to be a complete Texas themed outfit in red, white and blue to go with THE most gorgeous pair of boots.

I started it back in the US and the fabric that came was not to our liking, whilst the blue was a bit deeper than expected it actually will absolutely nail the colour in the boots but the red was giving me fits.

I'd ordered a true red and what came changed like a chameleon in many different light sources to the point that I had to disappoint and not have it finished for when she wanted to debut this beauty. It looked burgundy more than anything. Insert mild tantrums and tears from me here!!

So into the shipping container and wait on its impending arrival. In the meantime, I had managed to locally source the same sort of suiting fabric in the brightest red that made my heart jump for joy!!

 

I now couldn't wait for it and my machine to arrive so I could crack on with this project!

It turned out sensational! Finished with embroidered stars, Texas flag state, yellow rose and blue bonnet combination's, finished with white deer skin fringe and some serious bling! Happy days indeed!!

 

Now back to 'The Yellow Rose of Texas'. To start The Alamo – Medium tells me 'the term “yellow” was commonly used in the 1830's to refer to mulattos and “rose” was a popular euphemism for a description for a young woman' (mulatto meaning a person of mixed white and black ancestry)

Blackpast.org explains 'West's possible forced separation from her black lover and her placement in Santa Anna's camp. According to legend, inspired her lover to compose the song we know as “The Yellow Rose of Texas.” Publicity surrounding the hotel in San Antonio that was named after Emily Morgan asserts that West was a spy for Texas'

The song is a traditional American folk song that originated in the 1850's. The earliest version found in Christy's Plantation Melodies No.2, a song book published under authority of Edwin Pearce Christy in Philadelphia 1853.

The song has since been reworked and recorded by many an artist including Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Elvis Presley and Willie Nelson to name but a few. It was chosen as one of the top 100 great Western songs of all time.

Mitch Millers version in 1955 became a gold record achieving #2 position in the UK and #1 position in Australia.

During the American Civil War it became popular with Confederate soldiers in the defeated Texas Brigade of the Battle of Nashville. Texans remained ever gallant even in defeat.

Who was Emily West? Emily D. West (c. 1815-1891) also known as Emily Morgan, is a folk heroine whose legendary activities during the Texas Revolution have come to be identified with the song “The Yellow Rose of Texas”. West was a free woman of color, of mixed race, or a “high yellow”…….in 1836, with other residents, she was kidnapped by Mexican cavalry. Forced to travel with the forces of General Santa Anna as they prepared to face the army led by Sam Houston, she was in the Mexican camp on April 21 when Houston's men attacked. The Texans won the Battle of San Jacinto in 18 minutes.

According to legend, Santa Anna was caught unprepared as he was engaged in 'other activities' with West when Houston struck. This was reportedly recorded in a journal in 1842 when a gentleman was told the story by Sam Houston during a steamer trip.

In any case, historians question the reliability of such a story but as history often predicts (bit like Chinese whispers), stories get embellished, legends are made and so it becomes. Why shouldn't we think the defeat occurred by those means?

Emily West has been immortalised in history regardless and a hotel, The Emily Morgan Hotel, in downtown San Antonio, is named in honor of the Texas heroine.

Maybe this outfit should be called 'Emily'?

Kat xo