Rusty’s TV and Movie Cars

A museum found along Hollywood Drive in Jackson, TN, Rusty's is worth a quick stop and if he acquires another building he will have a further 30 cars on display in addition to the 20 displayed in his current building.

Rusty Robinson has been collecting cars since he was 14 years old. He has been buying tv and movie cars with many being the originals. He also has replica's he has built himself and his attention to detail is outstanding.

Rusty will give you a quick tour then leave you to take photo's and check them out.

First we have the original firesuit and hood of Ricky Bobby's – Talladega Nights AND his underwear from the fire scene, lol!

 

Pee Wee's big adventure, original bike.

 

Next the original Fast & Furious Nissan GT-R that Paul Walker drove in the fourth movie and the neon green Eclipse from The Fast & The Furious.

 

Original Herbie Fully Loaded.

 

A replica Teenage Mutant Ninja wagon that Rusty built with the actual toy sitting on top.

 

A replica built full size Ghostbusters vehicle.

 

The DeLorean from Back to the Future and original futuristic red heavily altered Ford Probe from Back to the Future Part II.

 

Starsky and Hutch's Ford Gran Torino. A variety of Gran Torino's were provided for the filming of the series from 1974-1976 models. They all came painted in code 2B “Bright Red”.

 

Wayne's World original 1976 AMC Pacer with gorgeous baby blue paint and blue and white upholstery. Some other mods were made to the vehicle for the filming and additional restoration was carried after so it could be roadworthy again.

 

The actual batmobile from Batman movie with Michael Keaton and Adam West's bike from the TV series of Batman.

 

The 'Death Race' car Jason Stathom drove is the actual one that was built for the film, using a 2006 Ford Roush Mustang as the base.

 

The General Lee from Dukes of Hazzard is a replica in fine condition.

 

Also replicas of Scooby Doo Mystery Machine and of course Lightning McQueen from Cars.

 

Quentin Tarantino's 2007 film Death Proof featured Kurt Russell. This is the actual Nova used in the film and the jacket Kurt Russell wore.

 

He's got Munsters, Beverly Hillbillies and Blues Brothers replicas. The Blues Brothers film is said to have crashed the most cars during filming ever.

 

Then there is the actual sparkly purple vehicle used by Eddie Murphy in Norbit including his shirt.

 

This bike ridden by Damon Wayans in Blankman, is in full working order with its obscure parts. The main part of the bike was the one Arnold Schwarzenegger road and crashed in Terminator 2!

 

Knight Rider, remember Kit? Well that's there too.

 

The gorgeous red coyote from Hardcastle and McCormick.

 

Last but not least the bike used by Nicholas Cage in Ghost Rider.

 

I can't remember which cars but Rusty did mention that a couple of them only have 200-500 miles on them. An amazing collection and there are all sorts of other memorabilia as you walk in the door that I didn't get a pic of.

Would definitely visit again when he gets the rest on display.

Kat xo

Click on the link to find out more Rusty's TV and Movie Car Museum

 

Casey Jones

Casey Jones, climbed in the cabin,

Casey Jones, orders in his hand

Casey Jones, leanin' out the window

Takin' a trip to the Promised Land

Now you've got that stuck in your head, haven't you?! I did the whole way through the Casey Jones Home & Railroad Museum.

 

Mind you that is the chorus from Johnny Cash's version of 'Casey Jones'. The original 'Ballad of Casey Jones' was written by Wallace Saunders, a friend of Casey Jones.

Come, all you rounders, if you want to hear

The story told of a brave engineer;

Casey Jones was the rounder's name

A high right-wheeler of mighty fame.

It is long and tells of brave Casey Jones riding the trains and saving his passengers on his last fateful ride.

 

He was born John Luther Jones in Southeast Missouri on March 14, 1863, the eldest of 5 children. He and his siblings grew up in Cayce, Kentucky. He fell in love with all things railroad. During his railroad work when asked where he was from, with Cayce being the answer he was soon known and referred to as 'Casey Jones'.

Casey started work with the Mobile & Ohio Railroad as a telegrapher at age 15. While boarding with a family in Jackson, TN he met and fell in love with the proprietors daughter, Janie Brady. He and Janie were married in 1886 and had 3 children of their own. He was a devoted father and husband.

 

Having become a proficient telegrapher, Casey then moved up to the position of fireman. Eventually earning his ultimate role as an engineer, Casey was one of the best.

 

During his employ with Illinois Central Railroad, Casey was making a run from Memphis, TN to Canton, MS on April 30, 1900. At 3.52am he was killed in a train wreck.

The mainline was supposed to be clear for the mail and passenger run but Casey didn't know that ahead, a train had stalled on a siding due to a broken air hose, leaving 3 of its carriages still sticking out on the main line.

 

Casey had almost no warning but managed to slow his engine from 70mph to 35mph, telling his fireman Sim Webb to 'jump!' just moments before the impact. With one hand on the whistle and the other on the brake, Casey's engine collided with the other train and he was killed in the crash. He had managed to slow the train enough that all his passenger cars stayed on the track and all passengers survived. He was just 37 years old.

 

If my memory serves me correctly from the short introductory video, compensation payouts totalled around $29, with the highest being $5 for bruising to the fireman.

Through personal appearances by Sim Webb at events honouring Casey Jones, the ballad written by Wallace Saunders and his wife, Casey became famous around the world.

The museum houses many railroad artefacts, a model display of Casey's crash, news articles, photos, and much more. Through the museum and out on the platform is Engine 382 where you can ring the bell of the engine.

 

After hearing the railway sounds on the platform you can walk around to go through and view his original 1870's home that was relocated to the current site in 1980. It was originally located at 211 West Chester Street in downtown Jackson.

 

Also located here is a number of small shops in the Casey Jones Village. The Brooks Shaw & Son Old Country Store, is a step back in time! From the moment you enter there are the original post boxes, counters filled with old antiques, exquisitely ornate timber shelving, the antique original soda fountain and 1890's ice cream parlor.

 

The Old Country Store offers buffet style meals, three times a day or you can get take out or eat in the Dixie Cafe on the other side within the store.

The food choices were many and everything was very fresh. There is also another area with some old homes, chapel, bakery, mini golf and farm that we didn't visit.

If you ever get into Jackson, TN this is all worth a visit!!

Kat xo

Click on the link below for more info.

Casey Jones Village

 

Parker’s Crossroads

We left Tullahoma, TN this morning and it has been raining overnight. Not long into the trip and it's raining on and off.

Not far from Jackson and not our intended tourist stop for the day, we pulled into Parker's Crossroads for a quick look. Part of the Tennessee Civil War Trails, this where Union Troops led by Col. Cyrus L. Dunham fought Confederate Gen. Nathan B. Forrest's cavalry on December 31, 1862. This is where Forrest gave his famous order to

“Charge them both ways!”


 

Forrest had been dispatched with his 1800 men to sever U.S. Grant's rail communications in West Tennessee. After a successful two-week mission across the region, Forrest then headed east toward the Tennessee River.

 

Five miles northwest of Parker's Crossroads they stopped for a couple of days. Union Gen. Jeremiah C. Sullivan saw a chance to capture Forrest. He sent two brigades to trap the Confederates.

The morning of the 31st, after learning that Forrest's troops were at Flake's Store, Col. Dunham's brigade of 1500 men left Clarksburg and marched South toward Parker's Crossroads.

Dunham's men got to the crossroads first and formed a line of battle at Hick's Field, a mile northwest. Forrest's artillery and dismounted cavalry went into action on the northwest perimeter of Hick's Field, causing Dunham to retreat back towards John Parker's house at the crossroads, where they reformed a line, paralleling the Lexington-Huntingdon Road.

When Forrest flanked this position, Dunham changed his front northward,M suffering severe casualties from Forrest's artillery. Pushed south by the constant bombardment, the Union line took refuge behind a split-rail fence.

While unrelenting artillery fire held Dunham in place, Forrest ordered an attack on the Union rear. Dunham about-faced most of his brigade and charged southward but his forces were surrounded. With the battle seemingly over, Forrest parlayed with Dunham for surrender. Suddenly, Col. Fuller's entire Ohio Brigade arrived from the north behind the Parker house, where it captured 300 Confederate horse-holders.

Forrest was now caught between the two Union brigades. He thundered, “Charge them both ways!”, gathering 75 men and charging into the left flank of the Ohio Brigade. The swift counterattack disrupted the Union attack and Forrest escaped, heading to the Tennessee River Ferry crossing at Clifton.

(The above has been written from the Parker's Crossroads brochure)

All in all, here were 3000 Union soldiers (237 casualties) 1800 Confederate soldiers (500 casualties).

Forrest led a number of brigades through several battles during a a four year period from1861-1865. He later became a member of the Ku Klux Klan in 1867, just two years after it was formed and was elected its first Grand Wizard.

He remains today as a highly controversial individual. Ya think!?! A very interesting story behind this Civil War General indeed.

So there's a little piece of history in brief for today's trip.

Kat xo

Parker's Crossroads

Gen. Nathan B. Forrest

Civil War Battlefields